The Journal of Special Education Apprenticeship: Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
Vol 7, No 2 (June 2018)                                                                                                      

Table of Contents

Editorial

  FullText
        Beth Jones & Brittany L. Hott
        Texas A&M University-Commerce

We are pleased to share the summer 2018 issue of the Journal of Special Education Apprenticeship. This issue would not have been possible without the effort of our entire JOSEA team. We wish to thank Dr. Sang Nam for his continued work as the publications manager. Our editorial board is growing, and we are thankful for timely and thoughtful reviews. We also want to express our sincere appreciation to the authors whose work is included in this issue. The dedication of the JOSEA team to the special education field is evident and reflected in the important work included in our latest issue.

The summer 2018 issue of JOSEA includes six articles on a variety of special education topics. The first empirical study is contributed by Dr. Maria Peterson-Ahmad of Western Oregon University. The piece is entitled, Pre-Service Teacher Perceptions and Knowledge Regarding Professional Development: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs. The second research-based article included in this issue, Effects of a Graphic Organizer Intervention Package on the Mathematics Word Problem Solving Abilities of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders, comes to us from Dr. Lauren Delisio of Rider University. A Qualitative Examination of the Serviceability of Teaching Practice Modifications Aimed for Special Education Teacher Candidates is an additional empirical piece submitted by Dr. Çavusoglu of Anadolu University. The final empirical piece in this issue is entitled, An Overview of Review Studies on Effectiveness of Major AAC systems for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities including Autism, and is contributed by Dr. Sang Nam of California State University, San Bernardino.

There are two practitioner articles included in this issue as well. The first, Using a Universal Design for Learning Framework to Enhance Engagement in the Early Childhood Classroom, is submitted by Dr. Marla Lohmann of Colorado Christian University. The final article in this issue is contributed by Dr. Janet Josephson of Millersville University. Her piece is entitled, Strategies for Supporting Students Who Are Twice-Exceptional.

We are hopeful that the issue is beneficial to the JOSEA readership and want to share some recent updates. JOSEA continues to actively seek empirical research articles reporting results of quantitative, qualitative, single case, and mixed methods studies. Empirical reviews using meta-analytic and research synthesis methods are also encouraged. JOSEA includes a section dedicated to practitioner articles which share evidence-based practices for students with, or at-risk, for exceptionalities. Please see our updated Author Guidelines for additional information (http://josea.info/index.php?page=author). We encourage you to submit your work and consider volunteering to serve as a guest reviewer for upcoming issues.


Articles

Pre-Service Teacher Perceptions and Knowledge Regarding Professional Development: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs

        Maria B. Peterson-Ahmad, Ph.D.
        Western Oregon University
        Katrina A. Hovey, Ph.D.
        Western Oregon University
        Pamela K. Peak, Ph.D.
        University of North Texas

Abstract: This research study discusses results from a mixed-methods study of N=164 pre-service teachers' perceptions of and involvement in professional related activities and organizations related to students with special needs. Results found similarities between special education and general education certification seekers perceptions of beneficial training topics and perceived roadblocks to professional development participation. Since the job-related duties of teachers is vast and attrition rates of highly qualified special education teachers indicate that they leave the classroom at approximately twice the rate of their general education counterparts (Mitchell & Arnold, 2004), suggestions for increased training and professional opportunities are discussed specific to teacher preparation programs.


  01   FullText
Effects of a Graphic Organizer Intervention Package on the Mathematics Word Problem Solving Abilities of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

        Lauren A. Delisio
        Rider University
        Caitlyn A. Bukaty
        University of Central Florida
        Matthew Taylor
        University of Central Florida

Abstract:Many of the top 21st century careers require advanced mathematics skills. However, mathematics is a known area of difficulty for students with disabilities (SWD), as they struggle in this area at a higher rate than peers without disabilities (O'Brien, 2016). Mathematical word problems incorporate comprehension of written language, an area known to pose additional challenges for SWD identified as having autism spectrum disorders (ASD; Smith-Myles, Simpson, & Becker, 1995). The authors describe an intervention involving the K-N-W-S graphic organizer, studied for the first time with the intent of examining its effect on mathematical word problem solving of students with ASD. In addition to the background, methods, and results of the current study, the authors discuss implications and future directions of this research.


  02   FullText
A Qualitative Examination of the Serviceability of Teaching Practice Modifications Aimed for Special Education Teacher Candidates

        Veysel AKSOY, Ph.D.
        Tezcan ÇAVUŞOĞLU, Res. Asst.
        Gűlefşan Őzge KALAYCI, Res. Asst.
        Anadolu University, Yunus Emre Campus, TURKEY


Abstract:The process of training special education teacher candidates is an issue that has been widely discussed in literature, yet there is no consensus as to the most effective method. Therefore, it is recommended that methods designed to meet the needs of special education teacher candidates with proven efficiency should be used collectively. This research analyzed the serviceability of the teaching practice process considering its strength and weaknesses based on the views of special education teacher candidates and observations of researchers.


  03   FullText
An Overview of Review Studies on Effectiveness of Major AAC systems for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Including Autism

        Sang Nam, Ph.D., BCBA
        Jemma Kim, Ph.D.
        Shannon Sparks, Ph.D.
        California State University, San Bernardino


Abstract:This paper provides an overview of five review studies that analyzed 92 single subject studies on the effectiveness of major augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems for individuals with developmental disabilities including autism. This paper offers recommendations useful for AAC decision-making points. Research on the effectiveness of main communication systems over the last 25 years has yielded mixed and inconsistent results on communication and preference outcomes. The heterogeneity of a large quantity of studies involved various research designs, participants, and multiple components is a major concern with the review studies. It is recommended to conduct more focused syntheses of empirical studies in terms of research designs, target population, and program components.


  04   FullText
Using a Universal Design for Learning Framework to Enhance Engagement in the Early Childhood Classroom

        Marla J. Lohmann
        Colorado Christian University
        Katrina A. Hovey
        Western Oregon University
        Ariane N. Gauvreau
        University of Washington


Abstract:In order to meet the needs of young children, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) recommends teachers utilize developmentally appropriate practice, DAP. For young children with disabilities, teachers must also utilize the Division of Early Childhood (DEC) Recommended practices, evidence-based teaching practices aimed at enhancing learning outcomes for children and their families (DEC, 2014) that pair well with the NAEYC developmentally appropriate practices. Both NAEYC's DAP and DEC's Recommended Practices align with the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). UDL is a framework for proactively addressing the needs of diverse and exceptional learners by ensuring all children have access to the curriculum. UDL includes the use of multiple means of engagement, multiple means of representation, and multiple means of expression. This article provides a brief overview of evidence-based UDL practices, with a specific focus on the use of engagement strategies for young children.


  05   FullText
Strategies for Supporting Students Who Are Twice-Exceptional

        Janet Josephson
        Charlton Wolfgang
        Rich Mehrenberg
        Millersville University of Pennsylvania


  06   FullText